한줄분해 [224_s2]

1
 sslight-1303 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① Breadth of knowledge is what enables you to engage in meaningful small talk, and small talk, as O. Henry once said, is similar to putting "a few raisins into the tasteless dough of existence." 
17.5






② In short, there's nothing small about small talk; it's a social lubricant that looms large in all human exchanges. 
6.7




③ Thus, being informed on a wide range of topics outside your area of expertise can be immensely helpful in building social bridges. 
10.8




④ Research has shown that the more people feel they have in common the better they like each other. 
5.8




⑤ So by increasing your breadth of knowledge, you'll be able to project a favorable image more easily with more people. 
6.4





2
 sslight-1304 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① Although people can agree on the need for conservation and strong anti-pollution efforts when costs are not considered, when costs are considered there is significantly less agreement. 
10.9




② Let's consider some of these costs. 
2.2




③ They involve restrictions on individual actions, relocation of industry and jobs, new bureaucracy, and the development of expensive new technology. 
7.3




④ In assessing the issue of pollution, the costs as well as the benefits must be considered. 
7.5




⑤ Therefore, it is unlikely that we will decide to institute a "no pollution" policy; that would be impossible to implement. 
5.9




⑥ And even approaching a standard of "little" pollution, for many, would be too expensive. 
5.9




⑦ Instead we are likely to choose an "optimal level" of pollution. 
4.6





3
 1663-22 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① When we hear a story, we look for beliefs that are being commented upon. 
13.5




② Any story has many possible beliefs inherent in it. 
5.2




③ But how does someone listening to a story find those beliefs? 
3.6




④ We find them by looking through the beliefs we already have. 
6.6




⑤ We are not as concerned with what we are hearing as we are with finding what we already know that is relevant. 
13.3




⑥ Picture it in this way. 
0.1




⑦ As understanders, we have a list of beliefs, indexed by subject area. 
5.2




⑧ When a new story appears, we attempt to find a belief of ours that relates to it. 
9.4




⑨ When we do, we find a story attached to that belief and compare the story in our memory to the one we are processing. 
18.6




⑩ Our understanding of the new story becomes, at that point, a function of the old story. 
2.1




⑪ Once we find a belief and connected story, we need no further processing; that is, the search for other beliefs stops. 
6.8





4
 sslight-602 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① From our earliest experiences of narrative, beginning with the stories our parents tell us when we do something of which they particularly approve or disapprove, we know, without needing complex interpretive theories, that stories have a moral, a lesson we are supposed to learn and integrate. 
22.9






② Indeed, many of the stories we are told are carefully selected to present particular pictures of the world rather than others for precisely this reason. 
14.6




③ When young, it is our parents who practice the selection, but as we get older, other institutions, including commercial interests, also vie to present particular lessons rather than others by means of narratives about the world. 
21.3






④ Our educational systems are narrative forces of precisely this sort, using language that is carefully selected and anything but neutral to propose a particular view of the world in order to socialize us. 
14.6







5
 2162-36 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① Consider the story of two men quarreling in a library. 
4.7




② One wants the window open and the other wants it closed. 
2.5




③ They argue back and forth about how much to leave it open: a crack, halfway, or three‑quarters of the way. 
3.4




④ No solution satisfies them both. 
1.8




⑤ Enter the librarian. 
0.6




⑥ She asks one why he wants the window open: "To get some fresh air." 
1.1




⑦ She asks the other why he wants it closed: "To avoid a draft." 
2.7




⑧ After thinking a minute, she opens wide a window in the next room, bringing in fresh air without a draft. 
6.0




⑨ This story is typical of many negotiations. 
2.1




⑩ Since the parties' problem appears to be a conflict of positions, they naturally tend to talk about positions — and often reach an impasse. 
9.2




⑪ The librarian could not have invented the solution she did if she had focused only on the two men's stated positions of wanting the window open or closed. 
21.1




⑫ Instead, she looked to their underlying interests of fresh air and no draft. 
3.5





6
 2162-29 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① While working as a research fellow at Harvard, Skinner carried out a series of experiments on rats, using an invention that later became known as a "Skinner box." 
14.6




② A rat was placed in one of these boxes, which had a special bar fitted on the inside. 
12.7




③ Every time the rat pressed this bar, it was presented with food. 
3.3




④ The rate of bar‑pressing was automatically recorded. 
2.5




⑤ Initially, the rat might press the bar accidentally, or simply out of curiosity, and as a consequence receive some food. 
10.3




⑥ Over time, the rat learned that food appeared whenever the bar was pressed, and began to press it purposefully in order to be fed. 
13.5




⑦ Comparing results from rats given the "positive reinforcement" of food for their bar‑pressing behavior with those that were not, or were presented with food at different rates, it became clear that when food appeared as a consequence of the rat's actions, this influenced its future behavior. 
24.7







7
 sslight-1503 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① Lions, snakes, and eagles are examples of predators -organisms that hunt and eat other organisms. 
5.7




② Those that have the best techniques for obtaining food are the ones most likely to grow and reproduce. 
10.0




③ Predation affects the size of prey populations and the diversity of species within a community. 
6.3




④ One reason nonnative species are often a serious problem is a lack of natural predators in their new homes. 
6.3




⑤ Purple loosestrife is such a species, whereas in its native habitats its populations are kept in check by a leaf-eating beetle and root-eating weevil. 
8.4




⑥ Parasitism is a variety of predation; a parasite feeds on prey but often weakens rather than kills its host. 
10.0




⑦ Some parasites, such as wheat rust, have very specific host requirements. 
6.7




⑧ Others, such as mistletoe, parasitize a variety of species. 
5.3





8
 sslight-904 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① Not only do we tell stories to remember them. 
8.7




② The opposite side of the coin is also true. 
2.0




③ We fail to create stories in order to forget them. 
1.9




④ When something unpleasant happens to us, we often say, "I'd rather not talk about it," because not talking about it makes it easier to forget. 
14.0




⑤ Once you tell what happened to you, you will be less able to forget the parts of the story that you told. 
1.5




⑥ In some sense, telling a story makes it happen again. 
6.5




⑦ If the story is not created in the first place, however, it will only exist in its original form, for example, in a form distributed among the mental structures used in the initial processing. 
20.2






⑧ Thus, in the sense that it can be reconstructed, the experience remains. 
2.7




⑨ When the experience was a bad one, that sense of being in memory can have annoying psychological consequences. 
9.9





9
 1863-25 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① Richard Burton was a highly regarded Welsh actor of stage and screen. 
4.9




② He was born in 1925 in South Wales, the twelfth child of a poor miner. 
0.4




③ Burton was the first member of his family to go to secondary school. 
1.9




④ Then, he attended Oxford University and later joined the British air force during wartime. 
3.5




⑤ After leaving the military in 1947, he made his film debut in 1949, in The Last Days of Dolwyn. 
4.8




⑥ Richard Burton went on to become a praised actor of stage and screen, who was nominated for an Academy Award seven times, but never won an Oscar. 
7.1




⑦ It is well-known that he had a powerful voice overwhelming the camera, the microphone, and all the intimacy of film acting. 
8.2




⑧ His final film was an adaptation of George Orwell's famous novel, 1984. 
2.9





10
 sslight-801 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① Baird, who was born in Helensburgh, Scotland, studied electrical engineering at the Royal Technical College in Glasgow and then went to Glasgow University. 
8.0




② His poor health prevented him from active service during World War I and from completing various business enterprises in the years following the war. 
14.1




③ After a breakdown in 1922 he retired to Hastings and engaged in amateur experiments on the transmission of pictures. 
7.8




④ Using primitive equipment he succeeded in transmitting an image over a distance of a couple of feet, and in 1926 he demonstrated his apparatus before a group of scientists. 
12.3




⑤ Recognition followed, and the next year he transmitted pictures by telephone wire between London and Glasgow. 
3.0




⑥ In the same year he set up the Baird Television Development Company. 
3.3




⑦ He continued to work on improvements and on 30 September 1929 gave the first experimental BBC broadcast. 
4.5





11
 sslight-1004 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① One of the persistent myths of mainstream society is that the knowledge we study in schools is factual and neutral. 
11.9




② Yet we know that knowledge evolves over time and is dependent on the moment in history and the cultural reference point of the society that accepts it. 
13.2




③ Thinking critically involves more than just acquiring new information in order to determine which facts are true and which false. 
11.0




④ It also involves determining the social, historical, and political meaning given to those facts. 
5.4




⑤ This determination includes assessing the investment various groups may have in furthering or challenging those meanings in any particular historical moment. 
13.0




⑥ For example, there was a time when it was not widely understood that the Earth is round. 
1.1




⑦ Common sense might tell us that it is flat, and anyone looking out over a vast landscape would have this sense confirmed. 
15.7




⑧ Yet when scientific reasoning and more accurate technological methods for measuring the Earth emerged, the knowledge or "fact" that the Earth is flat was rewritten. 
16.5





12
 sslight-1001 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① I have known several negotiators guilty of hubris. 
2.3




② They often dig their own graves because once they have made a take-it-or-leave-it offer, they can't tolerate the thought of losing face by returning to the table. 
11.2




③ You may argue that it's important to display toughness and resolve to the other side. 
5.8




④ However, earning a reputation for being tough doesn't serve you well at the negotiation table. 
10.6




⑤ Indeed, a reputation as a tough negotiator leads to a number of highly undesirable outcomes ― for example, counterparties will treat you with greater suspicion and act much tougher than they normally would. 
17.8






⑥ In an investigation of how bargaining reputation affects how others treat you, Cathy Tinsley found that "tough guys finish last," meaning that people negotiate more aggressively with those who have a reputation for toughness. 
14.3







13
 sslight-902 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① Dramatic play provides a risk-free stage where children can explore and experiment with ideas, test and evaluate their skills, and add to and change the environment in their own ways. 
20.0






② In role-play, children act as if they are someone else, imagining and weighing possibilities. 
4.9




③ This helps them analyze situations from different perspectives. 
5.1




④ Pretending to be someone else, with all the gestures, actions, and language that involves, gives children practice thinking divergently as they consider different things they can pretend to do. 
19.1




⑤ After they have decided what and how to play, their attention shifts to staging the play they have planned. 
9.1




⑥ Their thinking becomes more convergent. 
0.7




⑦ Creativity and innovation rely heavily on divergent thinking, but to accomplish goals, convergent thinking is also necessary. 
6.4




⑧ It's no wonder that research shows that young children who spend a good deal of time role-playing have high scores on measures of creativity. 
7.0





14
 sslight-903 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① Under Roman law there was a time for the coming of age of a son. 
0.9




② But the age when this took place was not fixed as one might assume. 
4.9




③ Rather, the father had the discretion in setting the time of his son's maturity. 
1.7




④ A Roman child became an adult at the sacred family festival known as the Liberalia, held annually on the seventeenth of March. 
5.8




⑤ At this time, the child was formally acknowledged as the son and heir by his father, and he received the plain toga adults wore in place of the toga with a narrow purple band at the foot of it which children wore. 
8.3






⑥ He was then conducted by his friends and relations down to the forum and formally introduced to public life. 
5.2





15
 1803-28 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① The Internet allows information to flow more freely than ever before. 
4.8




② We can communicate and share ideas in unprecedented ways. 
6.2




③ These developments are revolutionizing our self-expression and enhancing our freedom. 
4.6




④ But there's a problem. 
0.1




⑤ We're heading toward a world where an extensive trail of information fragments about us will be forever preserved on the Internet, displayed instantly in a search result. 
17.4




⑥ We will be forced to live with a detailed record beginning with childhood that will stay with us for life wherever we go, searchable and accessible from anywhere in the world. 
10.3






⑦ This data can often be of dubious reliability; it can be false; or it can be true but deeply humiliating. 
9.8




⑧ It may be increasingly difficult to have a fresh start or a second chance. 
1.8




⑨ We might find it harder to engage in self-exploration if every false step and foolish act is preserved forever in a permanent record. 
19.1





16
 sslight-901 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① Unfortunately, setting only big goals can feel overwhelming because they often take a lot more time and energy than smaller goals. 
8.6




② So break down large goals into smaller, more digestible and manageable chunks. 
4.3




③ As you achieve each smaller goal, you'll feel inspired and motivated to continue with what is left to ultimately achieve the larger overall goal. 
16.9




④ Each smaller success will bring you a great sense of accomplishment and tremendous happiness. 
5.1




⑤ Maybe you want to spend more time with friends. 
0.8




⑥ Maybe you want to increase the time you spend on a favorite hobby. 
3.6




⑦ Or maybe you want to increase your time meditating or practicing yoga. 
5.2




⑧ All of these, although seemingly small, are valid and worthy goals. 
5.7




⑨ Sometimes smaller things in life bring us the greatest joy! 
2.0





17
 1793-29 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① Why does the "pure" acting of the movies not seem unnatural to the audience, who, after all, are accustomed in real life to people whose expression is more or less indistinct? 
14.0






② Most people's perception in these matters is not very sharp. 
4.7




③ They are not in the habit of observing closely the play of features of their fellow men ― either in real life or at the movies. 
7.7




④ They are satisfied with grasping the meaning of what they see. 
8.1




⑤ Thus, they often take in the overemphasized expression of film actors more easily than any that is too naturalistic. 
5.9




⑥ And as far as lovers of art are concerned, they do not look at the movies for imitations of nature but for art. 
8.1




⑦ They know that artistic representation is always explaining, refining, and making clear the object depicted. 
15.8




⑧ Things that in real life are imperfectly realized, merely hinted at, and entangled with other things appear in a work of art complete, entire, and free from irrelevant matters. 
12.6




⑨ This is also true of acting in film. 
3.9





18
 sslight-1002 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① The sale of street food is a widespread form of self-employment for the poor and otherwise unemployed in cities in developing countries. 
8.6




② It requires relatively basic skills and small amounts of capital, and provides the vendor's families with a reasonable income. 
11.6




③ It also provides food security to the urban poor, who may not have the assets to prepare their own meal. 
6.8




④ It has been estimated that in India alone, there are more than 10 million street vendors, and some studies say they constitute around 2 percent of the population of the major metropolises. 
9.5






⑤ In developed countries, food carts and trucks can be a gateway for trained chefs who do not have the resources to launch a brick-and-mortar restaurant. 
13.1





19
 evh2-401 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① When you look at a picture that your friend shows you on his or her phone, do you notice who is in the picture first or where the picture was taken first? 
3.4






② Whichever you look at first, that perspective may reflect your cultural values without you being consciously aware of it. 
13.1




③ These different points of view exist as personal and individual differences, but groups of people in a particular neighborhood, city, or country may also have striking similarities. 
8.9




④ In her book titled East Meets West, author Yang Liu, who was born in China and moved to Germany when she was 14, attempts to illustrate perspectives from her eastern and western heritages in several different contexts through eye-catching illustrations. 
14.2






⑤ They seem to open up a friendly discussion on the essence of differences not only between individuals but also between groups or communities. 
7.5





20
 evh2-402 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① The picture above is an illustration of two different approaches to solving problems. 
4.6




② The picture on the left shows a straight line while the one on the right seems to follow a more meandering path; however, they both end up reaching the destination. 
10.9






③ In simple terms, the process of reaching a goal has a beginning and an end. 
5.7




④ On the left, the most direct path can achieve a goal with the expenditure of as little energy as possible. 
7.6




⑤ On the right, several other factors seem to require attention before the same goal is reached, which is why the path is less direct. 
12.1




⑥ Is the emphasis on the end result or on the process? 
2.3




⑦ Putting it in other words, do you value efficiency or thoroughness? 
2.6




⑧ The answer to these questions depends on the characteristics of the individuals and communities involved. 
9.2





21
 evh2-403 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① Does the expression on your face always mirror how you actually feel as in the picture on the left? 
5.3




② Or do you often hide your true feelings in order not to hurt others around you? 
4.0




③ Do people express their feelings in different ways depending on the context? 
9.3




④ In social situations, some people consider carefully how their displays of emotion might be interpreted by others. 
6.1




⑤ Students have likely experienced similar situations after a big test. 
4.6




⑥ If Nika remained calm after she got a perfect score on her exam while Manfred got 70% and cried in disappointment, would the expression on each of their faces reflect how they feel? 
18.0






⑦ Nika may not want to make Manfred feel bad, so she might try to hide the elation she feels by being cool about it. 
10.7




⑧ However, Manfred may simply display what he feels at the moment. 
5.0





22
 evh2-404 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① A "blue" person may be critical of Nika and understanding of Manfred because Nika is not being honest while Manfred is being genuine. 
4.5




② The opposite may be true from the "red" perspective: Nika is respecting others' moods while Manfred is making classmates feel uncomfortable. 
9.3




③ A simple way to look at the distinction is to ask if it's more important to honestly let feelings show or if it's more important to consider the feelings of others. 
6.8






④ These perspectives on social manners, when repeated, may become a normal cultural practice. 
14.0





23
 evh2-405 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① The picture below shows the different perspectives of the role of a person in society. 
3.0




② Is the individual more important as the picture on the left shows, or is the group more important as shown on the right? 
2.8




③ Some people see themselves in the context of a group. 
1.4




④ They think themselves to be part of a larger whole, placing importance on harmony and relationships with others, possibly at the cost of their own personal recognition. 
11.8




⑤ Other people may emphasize individual talent and personal abilities that stand out beyond the group. 
7.0




⑥ If a group member has a good idea, should she suggest the idea to the group? 
3.9




⑦ A "blue" person may be praised for having the creativity to make a goal easier to reach. 
8.3




⑧ On the other hand, a "red" person might consider how the new idea affects the group dynamics and take into account the possibility of friction between members during a change. 
11.7







24
 evh2-406 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① Generally speaking, even though differences are what makes each culture unique, they may also be barriers to understanding. 
11.9




② Yang Liu's book isn't about ranking cultural differences in terms of which is better. 
13.7




③ The book is designed to show that there may be other ways to look at the world. 
2.8




④ Maybe it's easier to think of culture like taking photographs. 
3.9




⑤ The individual photographer uses a variety of different methods to capture what she feels is the most important aspect of a scene. 
20.5




⑥ Is it the lighting or the angle? 
0.8




⑦ Should there be people in it or not? 
0.1




⑧ Is a close-up or a wide shot better? 
0.6




⑨ Likewise, cultural understanding comes from being open to the idea that differences may come from putting value on different aspects of life. 
17.1





25
 evh2-501 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① It is now almost impossible to live a truly private life because every human activity, be it a walk to the park or the sending of a simple text message, produces data. 
10.3






② Phones, TVs, computers, cameras in cars, and sensors in buildings and street corners all generate different forms of data. 
4.2




③ The Internet of Things (IoT) connects home appliances to the web, uploading such everyday information as how often we take cheese from the fridge or do a load of laundry. 
13.5






④ The development of information and communications technology allows this data not only to be generated but also to be collected and stored. 
24.0




⑤ Almost every move we make adds up to form a vast bank of information called Big Data. 
6.9





26
 evh2-502 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① Big Data is frequently characterized and defined by volume, variety, and velocity: huge amounts of data collected from many different sources in real time. 
13.2




② In fact, the total accumulation of data from the past two years alone is greater than all of the information ever recorded before that. 
6.9




③ In addition, data comes in various forms, ranging from texts, pictures, and sound files to GPS-based location information and credit card transaction records. 
16.3




④ Moreover, such data is gathered and stored at a remarkable speed: as soon as you use your library card, a record of your visit can be sent to the web and may contribute to expanding the pool of data. 
12.7






⑤ Modern technology now allows us to analyze data in an efficient and economical way. 
7.9




⑥ When such data is analyzed with the help of statistical and computational tools, it may tell a meaningful story. 
7.0




⑦ It is worth exploring in the following illustrations how this new technology might influence the way we live. 
9.1





27
 evh2-503 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① Seoul and its satellite cities are home to more than 25 million people who are often forced to take expensive taxi rides late at night when buses and subways are no longer available. 
8.2






② When city officials decided to provide a new late-night bus service to commuters, they had to figure out the highest frequency routes and commuter hot spots so they could accommodate as many people as possible. 
11.3






③ With the help of Big Data analytics, city officials examined the records of five million late-night taxi rides and 30 billion late-night mobile phone communications, and discovered a sudden increase in rides and text messages at certain places and times. 
11.9






④ Based upon this information, they settled on several late-night routes and schedules to provide the bus service to the maximum number of people. 
10.1




⑤ This was how the Seoul Owl Bus came to be. 
2.2





28
 evh2-504 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① Over the next decade, Big Data will be replacing traditional academic guidance methods. 
5.7




② In fact, in some universities, data analysis has already been used to predict the probable success or failure of certain students. 
12.0




③ Data analysts have scanned through hundreds of thousands of personal and academic student records in order to predict when intervention may be needed. 
6.0




④ Certain behaviors seem to be informative, such as how often students see advisers and tutors or if they take a course out of sequence. 
7.6




⑤ Some universities have found that students' performance in "predictor" courses is often a good indicator of whether they will graduate or not. 
8.0




⑥ Based upon this Big Data analysis, many universities maintain a list of courses that might signal a need for intervention. 
7.0




⑦ If a student leaves the path of previous successful students, advisers can be alerted so they can reach out and offer guidance. 
10.5





29
 evh2-505 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① More complex analyses of Big Data will be changing the way health is assessed and medicine is practiced in the future. 
5.9




② The biomedical sciences are already so data-driven that biologists and doctors are accustomed to collecting, analyzing, and interpreting huge datasets with the help of supercomputers. 
16.2




③ The Human Genome Project is a case in point. 
3.2




④ It took 13 years to complete the first full genome sequence of one person, consisting of six billion base pairs. 
16.3




⑤ These days, it only takes about 24 hours to sequence a person's genome, demonstrating the massive impact data analysis technology has had on the field. 
13.0




⑥ Biomedical scientists are still trying to figure out what each gene in the sequence does and how they interact to affect our health. 
10.3




⑦ They are optimistic that genomic data analysis will revolutionize our understanding of health and disease on a scale we cannot imagine now. 
8.2





30
 evh2-506 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① Biological variety on an individual level has necessitated a move from Big Data to "really" Big Data. 
5.5




② Each person is unique in terms of diet, environment, habits, and the relationships they have. 
11.1




③ To add further complexity, hundreds of trillions of tiny bacteria live in the human intestinal tract, some of which help cells extract energy and maintain overall health, while others, like H. pylori, may cause stomach cancer or other diseases. 
25.4






④ No individual has the same combination of gut bacteria, and they may adapt and change over time. 
7.0




⑤ The enormous number of combinations can only be researched using Big Data analysis. 
7.6




⑥ Soon, medical researchers hope to understand how an individual's biological environment interacts with different microbes in order to create customized healthcare treatments. 
11.6





31
 evh2-507 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① It's hard to doubt that Big Data will continue to be an important part of human society. 
4.1




② Data-based prediction will replace simple guessing, arming people with techniques to uncover hidden patterns, unanticipated correlations, global trends, and other meaningful information that will hopefully lead to more informed decisions. 
20.1






③ Some argue it will fundamentally reshape our lives. 
2.9




④ However, it should be noted that Big Data is a resource that could be used for good or ill, and that, no matter what, using it may give rise to unintended consequences. 
20.7






⑤ Depending on what data you examine, how you interpret it, and what purpose you have, the end result may tell different stories. 
12.6





32
 evh2-508 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① What are the issues that deserve careful deliberation? 
5.1




② One of the biggest concerns is the question of whether or not past data can be used to predict future events. 
12.8




③ The results of Big Data analyses may mean that some people are denied health insurance coverage because of their family's genetic history, or that others could be put on watch lists because their past behavior indicates possible future criminal activities. 
17.4






④ History tells a story, but the future is always unknown. 
1.6




⑤ Another concern is whether the collector of the data or the provider of the data has ownership rights. 
5.1




⑥ For example, many companies sell their customers' personal information for commercial purposes. 
4.2




⑦ Both the buyer and the seller can make financial gains, but the customers that provide the information are left out. 
9.8




⑧ Like any resource, using it wisely can be beneficial, but using it carelessly can lead to unexpected outcomes. 
13.3





33
 evh2-601 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① THE YEAR WAS 2081, and everybody was finally equal. 
1.2




② They weren't only equal before the law — they were equal in every other way. 
2.2




③ Nobody was smarter, better looking, stronger, or quicker than anybody else. 
1.9




④ The new constitution of the United States and the agents of the Handicapper General (HG) guaranteed all this wonderful equality. 
7.2




⑤ Some things about life still weren't quite equal, however. 
2.5




⑥ Some months were colder or hotter than others. 
0.4




⑦ And it was in the warm month of April that the HG men took George and Hazel Bergeron's nineteen-year-old son Harrison away. 
4.1





34
 evh2-602 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① It was tragic, all right, but George and Hazel couldn't think about it very hard. 
1.2




② Hazel had a perfectly average intelligence, which meant she couldn't think about anything except in short bursts. 
8.8




③ And George, while his intelligence was way above normal, had a little handicap radio in his ear that made it difficult for him to concentrate. 
12.0




④ He was made by law to wear it at all times. 
1.0




⑤ It was tuned to a government transmitter. 
2.8




⑥ Every twenty seconds or so, the transmitter would send out some sharp noise to keep people like George from taking unfair advantage of their brains. 
9.4




⑦ George and Hazel were watching television. 
2.2




⑧ There were tears on Hazel's cheeks, but she'd forgotten for the moment why she was crying. 
5.1




⑨ Ballerinas danced across a television screen. 
3.9




⑩ "BUZZ" went the transmitter in George's ear. 
1.3




⑪ Gone were his thoughts. 
3.4




⑫ "That was a real pretty dance they just did," said Hazel. 
0.4




⑬ "Huh" said George. 
0.1




⑭ "That dance — it was nice," said Hazel. 
0.3




⑮ "Yup," said George. 
0.1




⑯ He tried to think a little about the ballerinas. 
0.4




⑰ They weren't really very good. 
0.4




⑱ Anybody could have done as good a job. 
2.3




⑲ They had big weights holding them down, so they couldn't jump high. 
4.7




⑳ They had masks on their faces so that no one might see the beauty inside. 
5.6





35
 evh2-603 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① George was toying with the vague notion that maybe dancers shouldn't be handicapped. 
9.4




② But he didn't get very far before another noise scattered his thoughts. 
3.6




③ "BUZZ BUZZ" went the transmitter in his ear. 
1.6




④ Hazel heard the sound from across the room. 
0.2




⑤ "I'd like to hear those noises," she said, a little enviously because she had no radio in her ear. 
1.3




⑥ "If I were Diana Moon Glampers, the Handicapper General, you know what I'd do?" she continued. 
6.2




⑦ "I'd put beautiful chimes in people's ears. 
0.7




⑧ People would be happier that way. 
0.3




⑨ I'd make a good HG, I think." 
0.3




⑩ "Well, as good as anybody else, I guess," said George. 
3.3




⑪ He began to think glimmeringly of his abnormal son Harrison, who was now in jail — maybe he'd make a good HG. 
2.1





36
 evh2-604 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① "BUZZ BUZZ" went the transmitter in his ear. 
1.6




② "Boy" said Hazel, "I heard that from all the way across the room." 
0.5




③ George held his ears and started trembling. 
1.9




④ It was so loud that tears formed under his eyes. 
6.2




⑤ "You look tired," said Hazel. 
7.1




⑥ "Why don't you put your head down on the couch? 
0.4




⑦ You can rest your handicap bag as well." 
1.3




⑧ In George's handicap bag were placed several lead balls. 
3.6




⑨ These prevented him from running too fast. 
3.8




⑩ "What?" "You've been so tired lately, honey," said Hazel. 
12.5




⑪ "If only we could cut a few holes in the bag and take out a few balls." 
3.0




⑫ "I don't think about it anymore. 
0.3




⑬ It's just a part of me. 
0.3




⑭ And anyway, if I did it, then other people would do the same thing. 
6.2




⑮ Pretty soon, we'd be back in the dark ages again where everybody would be competing with everybody else. 
4.5




⑯ Surely you don't want to live in that kind of world." 
2.0




⑰ "Do you really think that's possible?" 
1.3




⑱ "BUZZ BUZZ" went the buzzer in George's ear. 
1.3




⑲ "Huh? What are you talking about?" 
2.1




⑳ "Never mind," said Hazel. 
0.4




㉑ The television program was suddenly interrupted for a news bulletin. 
1.8




㉒ It wasn't clear at first what the bulletin was about. 
4.0




㉓ The announcer, like all announcers, had a serious speech impediment. 
5.0




㉔ "L-L-L-Ladies and g-g-g-gentlemen." 
0.6




㉕ The announcer gave up, handing his sheet of paper to a ballerina. 
2.2




㉖ He asked her if she could read it for him. 
0.4




㉗ She must have been extraordinarily beautiful since she wore a hideous mask. 
3.6





37
 evh2-605 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① "Ladies and gentlemen," said the ballerina, reading the bulletin. 
1.5




② It was easy to see that she was the strongest and most graceful of all the dancers. 
1.7




③ She carried enormous handicap bags. 
2.2




④ She had to apologize for her beautiful, warm, and musical voice. 
1.8




⑤ She cleared her throat and continued, making her voice completely average. 
8.1




⑥ "Harrison Bergeron, age nineteen, has just escaped from jail. 
3.7




⑦ He was jailed for trying to take over the government. 
5.0




⑧ He is a genius and an athlete, has no handicap, and should be regarded as extremely dangerous." 
9.3




⑨ A police photograph of Harrison Bergeron was flashed on the screen upside down, then sideways, upside down again, then right side up. 
4.0




⑩ He was handsome and tall — 200 centimeters tall, in fact. 
1.8




⑪ In another picture, he was shown wearing his handicaps. 
6.3




⑫ He wore a huge pair of earphones that slowed down any thinking and big, heavy glasses that made him nearly blind. 
7.4




⑬ Pieces of metal hung all over him, pressing him into his seat. 
4.7




⑭ Metal dangled from his shirt pockets and across his shoulders. 
4.4




⑮ On Harrison's strong body, he carried no less than 180 kilograms. 
0.7




⑯ To hide his good looks, Harrison was required to wear a big, red clown's nose, and his eyebrows were all shaved. 
5.8




⑰ "If you see this boy, don't approach him. 
3.3




⑱ He's dangerous," said the ballerina unnaturally. 
1.4





38
 evh2-606 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① Then, suddenly, a door was pulled from its frame and thrown to the dance stage. 
10.1




② George Bergeron looked closely at the boy who emerged from beyond the door, carrying his heavy metal and wearing his ridiculous clown's nose. 
12.3




③ "My God, That's our Harrison!" 
0.1




④ "BUZZ" The cameras focused on Harrison. 
2.9




⑤ He stood there — a giant amongst men at the center of the stage. 
1.1




⑥ Ballerinas, engineers, and announcers trembled before him, expecting to die. 
8.8




⑦ "I am the Emperor" cried Harrison. 
0.4




⑧ "Do you hear? I am the Emperor, Everybody must do what I say at once! 
3.5




⑨ Even though I stand here handicapped and weakened, I am greater than any man who ever lived! 
3.1




⑩ Now watch me become even greater!" 
2.6




⑪ Harrison tore off his chains with ease and dropped them on the floor. 
3.4




⑫ He then smashed his earphones against the wall, threw away his clown's nose, and revealed a face that would have amazed Thor, the god of thunder. 
7.2





39
 evh2-607 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① "Now," he said. 
0.1




② "Who will be my Empress?" 
0.6




③ The people knelt before him. 
0.7




④ "Let the first woman rise to join me as my partner." 
3.7




⑤ A ballerina slowly rose, swaying on her feet like a gentle rose in the breeze. 
8.8




⑥ "Why should you be made to carry these handicaps? 
3.3




⑦ Why should anyone?" 
0.0




⑧ Harrison asked. 
0.3




⑨ He pulled the buzzer from her ear, snapped off her heavy bags, and removed her mask. 
5.6




⑩ She was blindingly beautiful. 
0.9




⑪ "Now," said Harrison, taking her hand. 
3.7




⑫ "Shall we show the people the meaning of the word 'dance'? 
1.7




⑬ Music" he commanded. 
1.0




⑭ The music began cautiously at first. 
1.8




⑮ Harrison stripped the musicians of their handicaps and said, "Try it now." 
2.1




⑯ Soon, the most beautiful music sounded out throughout the music hall. 
4.1




⑰ Harrison took his Empress by the hand. 
1.2




⑱ They danced gracefully across the stage, and then in an explosion of joy, into the air they jumped! 
4.0




⑲ They whirled, and Harrison dipped his Empress nearly to the ground. 
2.3




⑳ There were tears in the eyes of all those watching. 
1.1




㉑ They'd never known that such beauty could be possible. 
1.3




㉒ The dancers leapt up into the high ceiling. 
2.0




㉓ When the music came to an end, they embraced passionately and cried tears of joy. 
3.1




㉔ It was then that Diana Moon Glampers, the Handicapper General, entered the stage. 
4.2




㉕ Diana Moon Glampers said, "Listen up, everybody! 
0.3




㉖ I'll give you one minute to put your handicaps back on. 
3.1




㉗ Or you will all die." 
0.1





40
 evh2-608 
😼 주제 모냐옹?


① Right at the moment, the Bergerons' television screen went black. 
2.8




② "That was weird," said Hazel. 
1.0




③ But George had gone into the kitchen to grab a beer. 
4.3




④ George opened his can of beer. 
2.1




⑤ "You've been crying. 
4.1




⑥ What's up with that?" he asked Hazel. 
0.3




⑦ "Um, you know, I just can't remember. 
0.6




⑧ I think there was something sad on television." 
0.5




⑨ "What?" "I don't know." 
0.1




⑩ "Just forget such things. 
0.3




⑪ That's my girl," George said. 
0.1




⑫ The buzzing in his ear was tremendous. 
1.2




⑬ "It just feels so weird," said Hazel. 
1.1




⑭ "Why do we have to feel things? 
0.1




⑮ Why in this day and age do we need to feel sad things?" 
0.7





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